Blog Widget

  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 13

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 5/18/2020
    This week will be begin our unit on Political Parties and Elections.  Some of you might be confused about whether you are a conservative (usually Republicans), liberal (usually Democrats) or moderate (Mostly in the Middle of these 2). This week, instead of an article, you will be taking a political ideology quiz. It is fairly simple and doesn't take long. The quiz will give you a great deal of information about what you think politically (your ideology). Here is what I would like you to do this week:
     
    Take the quiz at Political Quiz. Then, come back here and explain your results in all of these categories:
     
    1. Describe your ideology based on the quiz below. Use the results page AFTER taking the quiz.
    2. In what part of the quiz did you differ on than those typical of your ideology?  
    3. What did you learn about your ideology?.
     
    Your response should be at least five sentences in length.  Please remember to SIGN IN and EDIT your writing.
    Comments (19)
  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 12

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 5/11/2020

    This week we will conclude our study of the judicial branch of government. One concept that we have studied in this unit is judicial review. Judicial review is the Court’s authority to review any law and determine whether or not it is Constitutional. For this week’s blog I would like for us to review a recent Court decision and reflect on its outcome.

     

    Q1.  Explain what is meant by selective incorporation.

    Q2.  What part of the Bill of Rights has been incorporated by this case?

    Q3.  Summarize this case and the outcome.  

    Q4.  Do you agree or disagree with the Court’s assertion that a jury must reach a unanimous verdict in order to convict in state criminal trial for serious crimes? Explain.

     

    Supreme Court Decision

    Comments (19)
  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 11

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 4/26/2020
    THis week we will begin our study of the third and final branch of government, the judicial branch. The role of the judicial branch is to interpret the law, right? However, judges do not always reach the same conclusions when they interpret the law. Some judges view themselves as strict constructionists. These people believe in going by literally what our Constitution says. Others have a view of a judicial activist. These people believe that the Constitution should evolve with the times. When these two views clash, you get divisive decisions handed down. With this discussion in mind, here is what I would like you to do:
     
    1. Go to Complete List of Controversial Cases and choose one case and read the case description. 
    2. Come back here and first explain which case you chose and what it was about.
    3. Explain what makes this case so controversial. (If you can't do this, pick a different case!)
    4. How did the Court decide the case? Explain their decision. 
     
    Your response should be at least five sentences in length. Please remember to SIGN IN and EDIT your writing.
    Comments (28)
  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 10.

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 4/19/2020

    This week we will begin our study of the Executive Branch of government.  The President is considered to be one of the most powerful positions in the world.  Long workdays, high amounts of stress, and constant scrutiny make Presidents age quickly.  Do the perks outweigh the stress? I will let you study a typical week in the President's life. Here is what I would like for you to do this week.

     
    Click on link below to study the President's daily agenda. After studying President Trump's schedule for 2 different days, please do all of the following:
    1. What 2 days did you study?
    2. What patterns or trends do you notice about these 2 work days?
    3. What do you think is the hardest part of his job during those 2 days? What do you think would be the most enjoyable part?
     
     
    Please remember to sign in and edit your writing.
    Comments (30)
  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 9

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 4/5/2020

    Recently in class we have begun studying the structure of our national government. We have learned that to prevent an abuse of power the Framers created three separate branches and gave each branch the power to check and balance the others. One such example of this, is the legislative branch's power to impeach the President. If you follow the news, then you will know that the House of Representatives did vote to impeach President Trump and his trial was held in the U.S. Senate. So, for this week's blog I would like you to read the articles below and answer the following questions.

    1. Describe the impeachment process.
    2. Read the article and summarize the accusations made against President Trump.
    3. Conduct some additional research of your own and summarize the outcome of President Trump’s impeachment trial.  Do you agree or disagree with this outcome?

     

    What is Impeachment?

    Your response should be at least five sentences in length.  Please remember to SIGN IN and EDIT your writing.

     

    Comments (30)
  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 8

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 3/31/2020

    For this week’s blog we are going to explore the diversity of Congress and the impact individual members have on laws and policy. Clearly members of Congress exercise a great deal of influence over laws and policy.  Therefore one might argue that it is fair to say the beliefs and interests of each individual member are of great significance. But who are these members? Who makes up the 116th U.S. Congress? And what factors influence the decisions that they make? 

    Q1.  What factors do you think contributed to the changing demographics of the 116th U.S. Congress?

    Q2.  How and why is diversity good for our political system?

    Q3.  In the near future you guys will be voting.  When this time comes, what characteristics will you be looking for in your member of Congress? Why are these characteristics important to you? 

    https://www.usnews.com/news/politics/slideshows/116th-congress-by-party-race-gender-and-religion

     

    https://www.politico.com/interactives/2018/interactive_116th-congress-freshman-younger-bluer-diverse/

     

    Your response should be at least five sentences in length.  Please remember to SIGN IN and EDIT your writing.

    Comments (31)
  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 7.

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 3/10/2020

    Civil rights protect individuals from discrimination based on characteristics such as race, national origin, religion, and sex; these rights are guaranteed to all citizens under the due process and equal protection clauses of the U.S. Constitution, as well as acts of Congress.  When groups or individuals feel that their civil rights are being violated or ignored they can challenge it via the judicial system, and of course the government can and has responded to these challenges via court rulings and/ or policies. One such current example of this concerns a dispute about LGBTQ workplace rights.  Currently the SCOTUS is considering the meaning of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to determine weather or not it extends employment protections to indiviuals who identify as being transgender.  

     

    For this week’s blog I would like you to read the article below and visit the Equal opportunity Commission’s website to explore the text of  Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. After reading please answer the discussion questions below:

    1. Summarize your understanding of the two cases recently agrued before the SCOTUS.
    2. In your opinion, does Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 extend protections to people who are gay, bisexual, and also those who identify as transgender? Explain.
    3. Speculate as how you think the Court will rule.  What will be the implications of such a ruling? 

     

    LGBTQ Workplace Rights Dispute

    Comments (29)
  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 6

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 3/2/2020

    This week we will complete our unit on the Constitution. We studied the text of, not only the Constitution itself, but also that of the Bill of Rights. My hope is that you have learned about your rights and how these rights are limited. One such right that we learned about was the Eighth Amendment's ban on cruel and unusual punishment. We also learned that what we consider to be "cruel and unusual" can differ from one person to the next. For this week's current event I would like to view the websites below and answer the following questions:

    1. Identify what you think are the two strongest pros and cons of using the death penalty as a form of punishment.
    2. Based on your summary do you believe that the death penalty is a form of punishment protected by the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution? Or, do you believe that the death penalty is not a form of punishment protected by the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution? Explain.
    3. Explain why in your opinion the federal government has been inconsistent in scheduling executions. 

    Your response should be at least five sentences in length.  Please remember to SIGN IN and EDIT your writing.

    Should the Death Penalty be Allowed?

    Return of the Federal Death Penalty

     

    Comments (41)
  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 5.

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 2/25/2020

    This week continues a study of one of my favorite subjects to teach: The Bill of Rights. Ratified in 1791, these ten amendments embody all of the rights Americans hold so dear. So, what do you know about your rights? If you know your rights, do you know your limits? Let's find out this week. Here is what I would like you to do:

    1. Take the Bill of Rights Quiz to see what you know about its structure.
    2. Take the How well do you know your rights Quiz to see how well you can interpret your rights.
    3. How did you do? Tell me what you think you need to learn and study after completing both quizzes. Be specific. What did you learn about your knowledge of structure and interpretation of the Bill of Rights? Tell me something from each quiz!

    Your response should be at least five sentences in length. Please remember to SIGN IN and EDIT your writing.

    Comments (45)
  • Bells 2&4. Blog # 4.

    Posted by JOANNA BLUME on 2/17/2020
    On September 17th, 1787 our Constitution was signed and sent to the states for ratification. Last week we began our study of the US Constitution by dissecting the Constitutional Convention, and the factions that resulted over the ratification debates. This week we will study the principles of the Constitution and the Amendments added to the body of the original Constitution. Several years ago a survey found more people knew the 5 Simpsons more often than they did the 5 freedoms in the First Amendment. So, is the Constitution just an outdated document that Civics teachers use to take up space on their walls? I certainly hope not! I want you to see the document living in your lives all around you. So, in keeping 1787 in step with 2020, here is what I would like you to do this week:
     
    1. Read the article Why We Must Teach the Constitution.
    2. Thomas Jefferson said: “Enlighten the people and tyranny and oppression will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day.”  What do you think Jefferson meant with this statement? 
    3. In what way, if any, can studying the Constitution help you in the future? Explain your opinion.
    4. Take this Constitution Quiz to see what you already know! How did you do? What is one fact you learned from the quiz?

    Your response should be at least five sentences in length.  Please remember to SIgn IN and EDIT your writing.

    Comments (41)
Last Modified Today at 10:09 AM